MEDICAL WORK

IN NORTHERN CAMEROON

THOUSAND EUROS OF SUPPORT

FACILITIES

MILLION TOTAL BUDGET

% FINANCIALLY SELF-FINANCED

Donations: 20.000,- €

Project number: 51150










JETZT SPENDEN

CAMEROON

Population: 24 Millionen
Member union: UEBC (Union des Èglises Baptistes du Cameroun)

Areas of work
Church development | 3
Health Care | 8
Capacity building | 7
Children at risk | 3

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

In Cameroon EBM INTERNATIONAL is supporting many medical organizations. Just in the northern part of the country the Baptist Partner “Union des Églises Baptistes” (UEBC) is in charge of seven different establishments. A hospital in Zidim; a clinic, an eye clinic, and a pharmacy in Mokong; a hospital with an AIDS center in Garoua as well as a hospital ward in Gamboura and Dagaï. The Cameroonian Mahmoudou Michel is the coordinator for the whole medical work and he’s the one responsible in that area.

Our missionary Sarah Bosniakowski has been active in the hospital in Garoua since 2017. She is initiating different projects for the facility and participates in the area of trainings for the staff. With Sarah’s support they were able to start a program against malnutrition among toddlers. By specified malaria prophylaxis the disease can be reduced amongst children and the typical side effect of HIV and AIDS being tuberculosis can be better fought against by controlled drug delivery. In addition to that they are doing targeted vaccine campaigns.

The population of this region is strongly affected by poverty. Bad security due to the terror of the Boko-Haram sect has led to an even weaker economy. Now many internal refugees suffer from horrible conditions. The result is that many of them cannot afford medical treatment when in need or they are consulting a doctor when it’s already too late. Many of them then are in an advanced stage of their illness or are poisoned from self-treatment with illegal medication. It is important for the hospitals and the wards to educate about therapies with AIDS medication or about preventing the HIV transmission from mother to child. Within the realms of possibilities the refugees are being offered treatment for free.

This work finances itself by over 95%. Our support is aimed to keep qualified personnel in the house and add to the high quality of the work. We are promoting this by training the staff, supplying the clinics with medical material, keeping up a fund for the poor, and intensifying the health education.